• Application Scope







    Uncheck

    Search text
    Technology






Turck

Passive UHF sensor tags revolutionise production quality

Articles | By Hans Turck | 24 November 2015
Mittels eines neuartigen RFID-Labels von Turck sollen Dichtigkeitsprüfungen zukünftig automatisiert erfolgen. So kann UHF-RFID den neuen Anforderungen, entstanden aus der zunehmenden Komplexität im Fahrzeugbau, gerecht werden. Mittels eines neuartigen RFID-Labels von Turck sollen Dichtigkeitsprüfungen zukünftig automatisiert erfolgen. So kann UHF-RFID den neuen Anforderungen, entstanden aus der zunehmenden Komplexität im Fahrzeugbau, gerecht werden.

Turck and its technology partners bring a sensor tag to the market, which redefines processes with a special focus on the automotive industry

Water limits the functionality of UHF RFID technology, because it limits high-frequency electromagnetic fields and changes the resonance frequency. Water or other moisture reduces the read rate of UHF transponders to a minimum and makes the UHF technology unusable in practice in humid environments. Turck and its technology partners took advantage of this and developed a unique RFID label that makes use of the restricting effect of water in moisture detection. This innovation will be of great value for the automotive industry, in particular, as Business Development Manager Walter Hein reports to “RFID im Blick”.

Walter Hein, Business Development Manager RFID, Turck in interview with „RFID im Blick“

Water is the solution, not the problem

“From a physics perspective, water is a big problem within UHF RFID technology. Water absorbs radio frequency electromagnetic fields that are emitted by the reader to detect the transponder, and causes a change in resonance frequency when using standard UHF transponders”, explains Walter Hein. “Because of this, the reading range is strongly influenced by water, whether it is in front of or behind the transponder that is being detected.” Based on an IC developed by the company RF Micron, Turck and Smartrac designed an UHF label solution that uses water as a benefit instead of an obstacle. “The ‘intelligent’ IC cannot bypass the restricting effect of water, but it makes use of the changing resonance of the radio wave absorbtion.”

Walter HeinWalter Hein “RFID labels that have been specially designed for measuring the moisture within a vehicle make use of the changing resonance of UHF transponders. This hails a completely new process.”

Resonance is the key

A German automobile plant has run the first worldwide pilot test of the newly developed label, and the project is at an advanced stage. The label is used to detect water that might have entered vehicles during production. If the label continues to prove reliable in further tests, then a solution will have been found that can’t be solved by other currently available technological solutions.

“In order to measure the moisture trapped in the vehicle, the specially designed RFID label makes use of the resonance change of UHF transponders. The resonance of the data carrier changes when it comes into contact with water, and as a result the data carrier or the IC no longer receives much energy. The read range decreases. Because an RFID reader has a clearly defined frequency that cannot be changed, standard transponders can no longer be detected at a preset reading distance. The IC of the unique labels is so intelligent, however, that the change in resonance is detected. As a result, the IC adds more capacity or removes it to keep the original resonance frequency stable. These additions and removals take place in 32 stages”, says Walter Hein, explaining the function of the special UHF labels.

The labels are installed right at the start of the production of the painted body shell and remains there throughout the entire vehicle lifecycleThe labels are installed right at the start of the production of the painted body shell and remains there throughout the entire vehicle lifecycle.

Special software evaluates data

A special software was developed to calculate the amount of water that entered the vehicle from the captured data. “In the current pilot project, RFID handhelds are used to detect all vehicle sensor tags before and after the rain test. A special software is installed in a handheld, showing, in 32 steps, how much water has got into the vehicle based on the activated label capacity. The more the capacity, the more water there is at the location where the data carrier is placed”, reports Walter Hein.

The body shell is tagged

The labels are installed right at the start of the production of the painted body shell – this is a component that is produced first by every OEM; it cannot be supplied externally and remains there throughout the entire vehicle lifecycle, says Walter Hein: “The OEM, who runs the pilot project, has deliberately placed several transponders along the possible leakage lines instead of just a single one. Humidity could be detected with just one tag, but it would not be possible to find the exact location of the leakage. Using a single tag, the entire vehicle would need to be disassembled in order to locate the cause of the leakage. “By sticking several transponders to the body shell, the search area is restricted. “The time and manual effort that is required for testing and detecting the presence of water can be drastically reduced”, predicts Walter Hein.

Last modified on Monday, 07 December 2015 11:19
RFID & Wireless IoT tomorrow 2019
RFID and Wireless IoT tomorrow 2019Europe's largest congress for RFID & Wireless IoT
October 29. - 30. 2019
Darmstadtium, Darmstadt near Frankfurt, Europe
Conference | Exhibition | Live demos
We look forward to meet you!
 
RFID tomorrow

RFID & Wireless IoT tomorrow 2018

RFID Guide

Company + Application Guide RFID | NFC | Smart Cards

Subscription

RFID im Blick Global

Contact us

Your Contact to RFID im Blick Global